What goods did Britain want from India?

The colonizers were only interested in exploiting India’s natural resources as they transported items such as coal, iron ore, cotton and other natural resources to ports for the British to ship home to use in their factories.

What did the British Empire want from India?

India was the jewel in the crown of the British Empire. As well as spices, jewels and textiles, India had a huge population. Soldiering was an honourable tradition in India and the British capitalised on this.

What goods did Britain trade with India?

Incorporated by royal charter on December 31, 1600, it was started as a monopolistic trading body so that England could participate in the East Indian spice trade. It also traded cotton, silk, indigo, saltpeter, and tea and transported slaves.

What good things did British do in India?

So let’s take a look at 7 Good Things The British Did For India And Indians!

  • English language. The reason they taught English to the Indians was to have an ease of administration. …
  • Indian Railways. …
  • Army. …
  • Vaccination. …
  • Social reforms. …
  • India census. …
  • Surveying India.

What agricultural resources did Britain want from India?

The policy of commercialization of agriculture by the British encouraged market oriented production of cash crops such as opium, tea, coffee, sugar, jute and indigo. Indian peasants were forced to grow these cash crops that spoiled the fertility of the land and no other crop could be grown on it.

IT\'S AMAZING:  How many counties are there in Ireland?

What was exported from India to Britain?

One of the major commodities exported from India to Britain was tea. The East India Company began commercial tea production in Assam in the 1820s. … This popular drink generated a hugely profitable industry, and a tea culture emerged in Britain with its own quintessentially English customs and rituals.

What goods did Britain export to its colonies?

Exports to the colonies consisted mainly of woollen textiles; imports included sugar, tobacco and other tropical groceries for which there was a growing consumer demand. The triangular slave trade had begun to supply these Atlantic colonies with unfree African labour, for work on tobacco, rice and sugar plantations.

How did Britain take control of India?

The British were able to take control of India mainly because India was not united. The British signed treaties and made military and trading alliances with many of the independent states that made up India. … These local princes were effective at maintaining British rule and gained much from being loyal to the British.